6 Tips for Getting Started with Snail Mail


Last week I talking about why I love sending snail mail as an act of self-care. Today I'm giving you tips on getting started as a letter writer and snail mailer.

1. Get your friends' mailing addresses. This is probably the most involved step but it's the first! Tell your friends you're making an effort to send letters and cards every once in a while and that you can get them in on it. The holidays make a nice occasion to ask for this info if you'd rather wait til you have a good excuse! If you don't wanna keep a physical address book you can sign up free with Postable (which I know is what Mia uses) to create an easy, secure, online address book for yourself.

2. Start small with postcards. One of my favorite things to do is buy postcards and send them to friends. Post cards are great because they are cool art pieces that also take the pressure off you to write a ton. Staring at a blank page can feel like a whole lot of responsibility, but with more postcards leaving about about the same amount of space as a post-it note, you'll probably be able to send someone a quick, nice thought. Pro tip: go to the post office and ask them for postcard stamps! They're about half the price of a forever stamp and will get your postcard where it needs to go without you overpaying.

3. Buy some nice stationery. Nothing wrong with the rustic nostalgia of sending a letter to a friend on loose leaf but getting to write a cute card or on a fun piece of Rilakkuma paper really adds a little oomph to the thing, doesn't it? It's a little more motivating and it also means whatever you write is that much more fun/interesting.

4. Send thank yous. There's very little that is as good for your brain and your heart as saying thank you to someone. You can thank someone for a gift or a dinner or recommendation letter, but you can also just thank someone for being a friend, teacher, or smiling face. I try to always have a stock of thank you cards at my disposal since they never stop being useful!

5. Keep things simple. I try to always start and end letters with a well-wish. Talk about something you have in common, an old memory you have with that person, something they recently posted on social media that you loved, or something you experienced recently that they would like. For some people it can feel kind of weird to "talk" to someone without having a conversation, but I'll put it like this: what do you wish someone would send you? It's probably not that complicated or long.

6. Make time for it. If you can put aside an hour a month, or maybe during the weekends to sit down with a coffee, listen to some music, and write something to someone, you're doing great. It doesn't have to be an intimidating production. Just put an hour aside to write something nice for your grandparents or a far-flung friend. One or two less episodes of a show during a Netflix binge won't kill you.

Those are my tips for making sending letters super easy and non-intimidating! What are your biggest hurdles or tips for sending mail?

Share

No comments:

Post a Comment